Ct guided steroid injection in neck

In a retrospective study, Narozny and associates (2001) investigated the clinical effectiveness of nerve root blocks (., peri-radicular injection of bupivacaine and triamcinolone) for lumbar mono-radiculopathy in patients with a mild neurological deficit.  These researchers analyzed 30 patients (aged 29 to 82 years) with a minor sensory/motor deficit and an unequivocal MRI finding (20 disc herniations, 10 foraminal stenoses) treated with a SNRB.  Based on the clinical and imaging findings, surgery (decompression of the nerve root) was justifiable in all cases.  Twenty-six patients (87 %) had rapid (1 to 4 days) and substantial regression of pain, 5 required a repeat injection.  Furthermore, 60 % of the patients with disc herniation or foraminal stenosis had permanent resolution of pain, so that an operation was avoided over an average of 16 months (6 to 23 months) follow-up.  The authors concluded that SNRBs are very effective in the non-operative treatment of minor mono-radiculopathy and should be recommended as the initial treatment of choice for this condition.

SPECT-CT provides the ability to merge or combine the images often allowing the nuclear medicine specialist to more accurately pinpoint the site of any abnormality on your nuclear medicine scan. This may be of particular importance in certain clinical situations, when the interpretation of an area of interest may change depending on its location. For example, in small areas like the spine or feet, it is sometimes hard to determine from the nuclear medicine imaging alone whether the abnormality lies in the bone or the adjacent joints – fusing a SPECT with CT provides added confidence in identifying where the abnormality is.

Ask your doctor if you will get contrast dye as part of the CT scan. Before getting the dye, be sure to let your health care team know if you’ve ever had a reaction to contrast dye, seafood, or iodine in the past. This is important because reactions to these things may put you at risk for reacting to the contrast dye used in CT scans. If there’s a risk that you might have an allergic reaction, you may be given a test dose of the contrast dye first. People who have had a severe reaction in the past may need to take drugs (usually a steroid, like prednisone) to help prevent another reaction. Sometimes these drugs need to be started the day before the scan.

A nurse will check your pupils with a flashlight and ask questions, such as "What is your name?" You may experience nausea and headache after surgery; medication can control these symptoms. Depending on the type of brain surgery, steroid medication (to control brain swelling) and anticonvulsant medication (to prevent seizures) may be given. When your condition stabilizes, you’ll be transferred to a regular room where you’ll continue to be monitored and begin to increase your activity level.

Ct guided steroid injection in neck

ct guided steroid injection in neck

A nurse will check your pupils with a flashlight and ask questions, such as "What is your name?" You may experience nausea and headache after surgery; medication can control these symptoms. Depending on the type of brain surgery, steroid medication (to control brain swelling) and anticonvulsant medication (to prevent seizures) may be given. When your condition stabilizes, you’ll be transferred to a regular room where you’ll continue to be monitored and begin to increase your activity level.

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